Category Archives: Arts and Culture

Ondalinda To Bring an International Music Lineup to Mexico

Taking place on the stunning beaches of Costa Careyes, Mexico from October 27-30, Ondalinda is a boutique music and lifestyle festival embarking on its first journey this year with the goal of awakening the senses of those that attend. On the grounds of one of the world’s most coveted travel destinations will arise a community bound by alluring music, captivating activities alongside the waters of Mexico’s coastline, and a deep dive into the local Huichol culture during Dia de los Muertos weekend.

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Transforming a private beachfront resort, Ondalinda will bring around 400 individuals together to experience an international music lineup that will include ethereal vocals and minimal production from Vienna duo HVOB, deep global instrumentations from Berlin based producer NU, groovy basslines from Barcelona’s own Audiofly, mesmerizing tribal soundscapes from female duo BLOND:ISH, and luscious deep house vibes from LA producer Sabo, along with LUM, Gandalla, MENDRIX, and The Happy Show.

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Beyond the announced musical acts, those in attendance can look forward to no shortage of surprises along the way. They can also look forward to witnessing the legendary Mayan Warrior return to Mexico for the main event on Saturday night after its triumphant takeover of Burning Man 2016, which included a performance alongside the ubiquitous Robot Heart bus. Originally painted by visionary artist Alex Grey, the art car recently received millions of dollars worth of mind blowing improvements with awe-inspiring lasers and a visceral sounds system to transport onlookers to the very origins of Mexican culture.

ondalinda-fireIn addition to the music, guests are also provided the opportunity to immerse themselves in complete relaxation and separation from the real word. Explore the transformative beaches of Careyes, travel the crystal blue waters of the Pacific Ocean while paddleboarding or kayaking, or even journey beneath the surface and explore the colorful underbelly that awaits below while scuba diving. After a day of playing in the water, guests looking for rejuvenation call take part in jungle yoga while those seeking tranquility can enjoy spa services such as mud baths, massages, and ritual healing ceremonies.

Other highlights will include exquisite dinners hosted with delectable local cuisine, a cocktail party at Playa Rosa, an ocean sunset ceremony, and exclusive access to “El Cocodrilo” Beach Club every day from noon till sunset. Ondalinda will also join forces with Mexico-based entrepreneur and artist Philippe Moellhausen to transform Teopa Beach with monumental art pieces, vibrant decor, dazzling costumes, and indigenous live performances for guests to partake in.

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Above all, Ondalinda aims to honor authenticity by showcasing the art and teachings of the local Huichol culture. A portion of net profits from the festival will be donated to the Huichol to support their mission to preserve sacred land through the organization UNESCO, and an exclusive collection of Huichol art by the name “Los Navegantes del sueño” will be displayed with never before seen masterpieces that reflect the cosmovision of this mystic community.

Guests can also take part in talks led by a world-renowned Huichol expert Humberto Fernandez and 35.000 community leader Santo, enjoy a screening of the award-winning film “Eco de la Montagna,” purchase artisan crafts from the Huichol people in the Plaza throughout the weekend, witness a Huichol shaman and local musicians open the exhibition to invoke the Gods and bless the event, and learn about the Huichol art and its meaning from the local tribe themselves.

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When it comes to finding your home for the weekend, guests can choose from the many luxurious accommodation packages including breathtaking Castles, luxurious Villas, and beautiful Casitas. Whether you’re looking for a private villa framed by lush tropical gardens or an ocean castle featuring panoramic ocean views, Costa Careyes has an option to best suit your needs.

Join us on our journey into the hidden paradise of Costa Careyes for a truly transcendent experience. For more information on securing your tickets, please visit the Ondalinda x Careyes website. Please remember that space is limited and both tickets and accommodations are filling up fast.

 

Mexico’s Craft beer producers will hold the first “RisingHop 2015” microbrew festival in Puerto Vallarta, at Parota Park on November 20 and 21

Mexico’s Craft beer producers will hold the first “RisingHop 2015” microbrew festival in Puerto Vallarta, at Parota Park on November 20 and 21, from 11 AM – 11 PM.

hop mexThe aim is to promote the culture of craft beer that has been growing in the country, responsible consumption and family life, said Jose Armando Alvarado, organizer of the festival.  ‘It’s a good opportunity for people from neighboring states like Guanajuato, Michoacán, San Luis Potosi, Aguascalientes, Zacatecas, Colima and Jalisco itself, to visit Puerto Vallarta and enjoy Mexico’s growing beer craft,” said Alvarado.

He noted that in Puerto Vallarta there are a variety of attractions, as it is renowned not only for its beaches and its wide variety of culinary styles, but also for the warmth and friendliness of the people in Vallarta.

The first festival will feature 5 pavilions that offer, in addition to beer and food tasting, art, entertainment and activities for visitors of all ages. In total there will be more than 10 craft beer stands offering local, national, and international brews, and 10 food vendors offering traditional regional cuisine and international foods.
RisingHop 2015 festival in Puerto Vallarta will include live music from local and national bands from electronic, jazz, blues, and rock.
The pavilions will also host a variety of crafts from the region, such as handicrafts, jams, organic honey, bags, dresses, jewelry, bread, and more.

For this festival, the participation of breweries Brewing Los Muertos in Puerto Vallarta, The Terrible, Brewery Colima, five brands from Michoacán Brewers Association, plus imported Belgian beer through The Beer Box.

Friends of Puerto Vallarta Pet Animals and Purr Project, which will be present in publicizing their work and raising awareness to people about caring for their pets. A portion of the entrance fee will be donated to the two associations.

The entry fee to RisingHop 2015 is 100 pesos and will include a full pint or two tastings and bracelet.

For people who come with family, there will be a nursery and playroom that will give small workshops, which will help kids develop their motor and mental skills by experienced psychologists.
Official website of event. http://risinghop.com/

Seasonal Chiles en Nogada: The Mexican Flag on Your Plate

The following post is courtesy of the wonderfully talented, Cristina Potters. Her blog (Mexico Cooks!) is incredibly successful and we are proud to have her as a contributor to share her knowledge, recipes, and gastronomical expertise about Mexico.

Mexico Cooks! couldn’t start the month of September without paying tribute to our iconic chiles en nogada (chiles in walnut sauce), the Mexican flag on your plate.

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Mexico celebrates its independence the entire month of September with parades, parties, and traditional food and drink in restaurants and at home.  The traditional festive dish during the weeks before and after the Independence Day holiday is chiles en nogada, a magnificent tribute to the seasonal availability of granadas (pomegranates) and walnuts. From mid- August till mid-October, fresh pomegranates and walnuts make chiles en nogada possible.  Mildly spicy chiles poblano, stuffed with picadillo and topped with richly creamy walnut sauce and pomegranate seeds, flaunt the brilliant green, white and red of the Mexican flag.

This festive dish is traditionally served especially on September 15 or 16 in honor of Mexico’s Independence Day, though it is popular anytime in the late summer and early fall. During August and September in the highlands of Mexico, particularly in Mexico City and Puebla, the dish is very popular. On streets bordering city markets and tianguis (street markets), you will see village women sitting on blankets painstakingly cracking open nutshells and peeling the thin brown skin from each freshly harvested walnut. It is important to use the freshest walnuts possible, as they produce such a creamy, rich sauce that it is worth the effort demanded to peel them.  Yes, the recipe is time-consuming…but you and your guests will jump up and shout “VIVA!” when you’ve licked the platters clean.

Fresh peaches, in season now.
Fresh peaches, in season now.

Ingredients

For the Meat
• 2 pounds beef brisket or other stew meat or 1 pound beef and 1 pound pork butt
• 1 small white onion, quartered
• 2 large cloves garlic
• about 1 Tablespoon sea salt

Biznaga cristalizada (candied barrel cactus).
Biznaga cristalizada (candied barrel cactus).

For the picadillo

• 4 Tablespoons freshly rendered pork lard or canola oil
• 1/3 cup chopped white onion
• 3 large cloves garlic, minced
• 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
• 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
• 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
• 3 heaping Tablespoons raisins
• 1 or 2 chiles serrano, finely minced
• 2 Tablespoons chopped walnuts or pecans
• 2 Tablespoons chopped candied biznaga (cactus)
• 2 fresh peaches, skinned and diced
• 1 fresh pear, peeled and chopped
• 1 apple, peeled and chopped
• 1 extremely ripe platano macho (plantain)
• 1 large potato, peeled and diced
• 3 large, ripe tomatoes, roasted, peeled and chopped
• sea salt to taste

Chiles poblano.  Choose the largest chiles with the smoothest sides for easy roasting.
Chiles poblano. Choose the largest chiles with the smoothest sides for easy roasting.

For the Chiles

6 fresh chiles poblano, roasted, peeled, and seeded, leaving the stem intact

Newly harvested, freshly peeled walnuts.  All of the shell and the thin brown skin must be removed to make smooth, creamy-white nogada (walnut sauce). Photo courtesy Gabriela.
Newly harvested, freshly peeled walnuts. All of the shell and the thin brown skin must be removed to make smooth, creamy-white nogada (walnut sauce). Photo courtesy Gabriela.

For the Walnut Sauce

• 1 cup fresh walnuts
• 6 ounces doble crema or full-fat cream cheese at room temperature
• 1-1/2 cups crema mexicana or 1-1/4 cups sour cream thinned with milk
• about 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
• 1 Tablespoon sugar
• 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
• 1/4 cup dry sherry

Fresh, seasonal pomegranates, available now in Mexico's markets.
Fresh, seasonal pomegranates, available now in Mexico’s markets.

For the Garnish

• 1 Tablespoon chopped flat-leaf parsley
• 1/2 cup fresh pomegranate seeds

Method

Cut the meat into large chunks, removing any excess fat. Place the meat into a large Dutch oven with the onion, garlic, and salt. Cover with cold water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Skim off any foam that collects on the surface. Lower the heat and allow the water to simmer about 45 minutes, until the meat is just tender. Take the pot off the stove and let the meat cool in the broth. Remove the pieces of meat and finely shred them.

Warm the oil in a large, heavy skillet and sauté the onion and garlic over medium heat until they turn a pale gold. Stir in the shredded meat and cook for 5 minutes. Add the cinnamon, pepper, and cloves, then, stir in the raisins, the 2 Tablespoons chopped walnuts. Add the chopped pear, apple, and potato, and mix well. Add the tomatoes and salt to taste, and continue cooking over medium-high heat until most of the moisture has evaporated. Stir often so that the mixture doesn’t stick. Let cool, cover, and set aside. The picadillo may be made 1 day in advance.

Make a slit down the side of each chile, just long enough to remove the seeds and veins. Keep the stem end intact. Drain the chiles on absorbent paper until completely dry. Cover and set aside. The chiles may be prepared a day in advance.

At least 3 hours in advance, place the 1 cup walnuts in a small pan of boiling water. Remove from the heat and let them sit for 5 minutes. Drain the nuts and, when cool, rub off as much of the dark skin as possible. Chop into small pieces. Place the nuts, cream cheese, crema, and salt in a blender and purée thoroughly. Stir in the optional sugar, cinnamon, and sherry, if using, until thoroughly combined.  Reserve at room temperature.

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The stuffed chiles pictured above were dipped into an egg coating and fried prior to finishing with walnut sauce and garnishes. In Mexico, passionate diners argue the pros and cons of coating the chiles; many insist that coating and frying is not traditional, and many insist that it is.  Mexico Cooks! prefers chiles en nogada with no coating.

Preheat the oven to 250ºF. When ready to serve, reheat the meat filling and stuff the chiles until plump and just barely closed. Place the chiles on a serving platter or on individual plates, cover with the walnut sauce, and sprinkle with parsley and pomegranate seeds

Chiles en nogada as presented at Restaurante Azul/Histórico, Mexico City. This beautiful service is only surpassed by the flavors of the chiles.
Chiles en nogada as presented at Restaurante Azul/Histórico, Mexico City. This beautiful service is only surpassed by the flavors of the chiles.

This dish may be served at room temperature, or it may be served chilled.

Note: Many people in today’s busy world prefer to make this recipe using a mixture of ground rather than shredded beef and pork.  Using this quick method, simply brown the ground meats and add the rest of the picadillo ingredients once the meats are browned.  The results will be excellent!

To read more from Cristina, visit Mexico Cooks!
Looking for a tailored-to-your-interests specialized tour in Mexico?  Click here: Tours.

CHEF ALEXIS BOSTELMANN PROVIDES AN INNOVATIVE AND SOPHISTICATED CULINARY EXPERIENCE FOR JOYÀ

JOYÀ, the spectacular show from Grupo Vidanta—a full-service tourism developer specializing in luxury resort development in Mexico—and Cirque du Soleil—a leading entertainment company—conquers the most demanding palate with an exquisite dinner created by Chef Alexis Bostelmann, an expert known for elevating traditional flavors to a new level.

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After 10 years as executive corporate chef for Grupo Vidanta, including at the Vidanta Riviera Maya megaresort, Bostelmann is taking on a new project with a mission to create a world-class dining experience that promises to satisfy every bite with innovation and sophistication.

Bostelmann uses inspiration from the content of the JOYÀ show to develop a unique menu in partnership with Cirque du Soleil. The show highlights the magical journey of an aging alchemist and his granddaughter traveling through fantastical worlds on the relentless quest for the meaning of life.

Cirque JOYA Contortionist

“The idea was to combine culinary influence with the artistic appeal of the show. The theme merges cultural kitchens by infusing Mediterranean influences with Mexican ingredients,” said Bostelmann.

The evening experience begins with a selection of organic and mouth-watering appetizers. Regular and specialty options are available for the main course, including a catch of the day, prime rib, or vegetarian dishes. Dessert is presented in a spectacular, JOYÁ-inspired fashion – within a book – and Mercier champagne is glamorously paired with each course. Even the place settings are of impeccable custom-design.

“The dishes themselves consist of special pieces designed by artisans from Tlaquepaque. We also added some Michoacán elements to keep the Mexican essence,” said Bostelmann.

Cirque du Soleil Theater

JOYÁ is performed in the Cirque du Soleil Theatre in Riviera Maya, which seats 600 people comfortably and includes a dining area, a champagne area, two bars and two lounge spaces. 194 seats are designed to be able to watch the show while eating dinner, 342 of the seats are arranged cabaret style with champagne offerings available and 64 seats are high barstools, all of which lead to a night of entertainment unlike any other.

Cirque Intro Act

Ticket Information

To book ticket reservations today:
• Visit cirquedusoleil.com/joya or www.ticketmaster.com.mx
• Call 1-844-247-7837 (for US and Canada) or 01-800-247-7837 (to Mexico)

Price per person * (in US dollars) are:
• High Stools – Show     $65
• Show       $80
• Champagne and Show    $110
• Dinner, Champagne and Show  $165
• VIP Dinner, Champagne and Show  $225

*Does not include delivery service charges.

For more information about JOYÁ, please visit www.cirquedusoleil.com/joya or Facebook.com/JOYA and follow us on Twitter at #JOYAMEXICO

About Cirque du Soleil

Cirque du Soleil is primarily a creative content provider for a wide variety of unique projects. In addition to shows, the company, whose headquarters are located in Montreal, extends its creative talent to other spheres of activity. For any innovative project, Cirque du Soleil maintains rigorous standards of artistic quality and originality, and provides them with the same energy and spirit that characterizes each of its shows.

Cirque du Soleil is a Quebec -based organization providing high-quality artistic entertainment. Since its inception in 1984, nearly 150 million viewers in over 300 cities on six continents have been thrilled by Cirque du Soleil.

For more information about Cirque du Soleil, please visit www.cirquedusoleil.com

For more information about ONE DROP Foundation, please visit www.onedrop.org

About Grupo Vidanta

Grupo Vidanta is a full service tourism developer in Mexico and Latin America with practices in property architecture and product design, construction and operations. The company specializes in the development and operation of luxury resort and hotel brands in Mexico and counts AAA Five Diamond Award winning Grand Luxxe Nuevo Vallarta and three AAA Four Diamond Award winning resorts – Grand Luxxe Riviera Maya, The Grand Bliss Nuevo Vallarta and The Grand Mayan Riviera Maya – among its impressive portfolio of more than 25 resorts and hotels.

Grupo Vidanta’s visionary approach to the development of luxury beach destinations brings vacation dreams to life via membership-based resorts and mega-resorts on the coastlines of Mexico’s most sought-after locations – Nuevo Vallarta, Riviera Maya, Los Cabos, Acapulco, Puerto Peñasco, Puerto Vallarta and Mazatlán – with brands including Grand Luxxe, The Grand Bliss, The Grand Mayan, The Bliss, Mayan Palace, Ocean Breeze and Sea Garden, and more in development.

The company, which employs more than 12,000 individuals dedicated to design, development, construction and operations, is consistently recognized among the most revered employers in Latin America. Vidanta Golf is the largest operator of golf courses in Mexico, the real estate division has built and sold more than 2,000 vacation luxury homes, and the company is responsible for developing Mexico’s first privately built and owned airport, Mar de Cortés Internation Airport in Puerto Peñasco.

Grupo Vidanta was founded by Daniel Chávez Morán in 1974 and operates two foundations to enrich the lives of Latin Americans. For more information about Grupo Vidanta, visit http://www.grupovidanta.com

360Retreats Launches in Mexico and the United States

The newest trend in travel includes retreats customized and styled for you. 360Retreats, located in Mexico and the US, create exciting experiences for companies and travelers who want to take their vacation one step further with a vacation for the mind, body and soul.
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360Retreats was born out of an idea to create customized retreats that fuel the body, ignite the soul and provide rich cultural experiences. But what sets 360 apart is that they not only plan and lead their own retreats, they plan retreats for companies so that the company can focus on their client or staff goals, all while 360 takes care of the rest. Retreats are no joke when it comes to benefits, but anyone who has planned and led one understands that they are complex logistical creatures. 360’s goal is to make it simple for you so that you can gain the maximum benefits!

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360 is receiving  requests  from a variety of potential partners including fitness studios, spas and companies interested in professional development retreats for their staff. Their geographical expertise crosses Mexico, so start thinking about what setting fits your needs. Perhaps a boutique hotel surrounded by the aqua blue Caribbean, an eco-chic cabaña with a lush tropical jungle view or a mountain retreat with morning hikes and hot springs on the daily agenda. Of course you are wondering about their fees…. Well, get this – if you partner with 360 you will pay nothing and possibly even earn money depending on your arrangement and needs! It’s simple and straight forward and starts with you filling out a questionnaire. Then expect a personal call from Molly or Katherine Fisher (360 co-founders and sisters) to start working on the details.

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Molly and Katherine also want to share their personal Mexico favorites with you, their treasured guest. Guests are bound to have their senses awakened with daily fitness classes, unique adventures such as a pyramid tour, a visit to a local hot springs, or a stand up paddle board session. And of course there are cultural activities that range from salsa dancing to preparing fresh local cuisine using native plants to creating an art piece with a local artisan. There is truly something for everyone!
Collage 9Whether on a Partner or Signature Retreat you can expect to experience another culture while reenergizing with fitness activities and indulging in fresh local food all while being surrounded by stunning and serene landscapes.  Molly and Katherine are excited to share their journey with you. You can read more about them and 360 on their blog.   — 360Retreats gives back a portion of their proceeds to further their mission.
Coming up:
July 23 – 28th, 2015       San Miguel de Allende         MX, Guanajuato
September 2015            Isla Mujeres                                 MX, Quintana Roo

For more information on 360Retreats please visit www.360retreats.com

Mexico City Named No. 3 Most Inspiring City in the World

2014 GOOD City Index Names 50 Most Inspiring Global Destinations; Cities That “Best Capture the Elusive Quality of Possibility” Using A Criteria of Eight Attributes

MEXICO CITY, Nov. 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Mexico City is ranked No. 3 on the GOOD City Index (GCI), which ranks the most inspiring cities in the world. The annual list compiled by GOOD, media company that also publishes the quarterly GOOD Magazine, features cities that deliver on eight key attributes that “best capture the elusive quality of possibility,”: progress, civic engagement, street life, defining moments, connectivity, green life, diversity and work/life balance.

Zocalo, Mexico City, MexicoGOOD praised Mexico City Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera for his progressive approach to city government and reports reasons why Mexico City is continuing to emerge as a top global destination. In addition to Mexico City’s rich cultural history and deep traditions, the capital city is gaining acclaim as one of the world’s most influential culinary destinations citing attractions such as Michelin-starred restaurant Pujol and gastro-hall Mercado Roma. Mexico City also gained recognition for its sustainability innovations such as its bike share program and key initiatives overseen by Mayor Mancera including mobile health clinics, free uniform distribution, arts discount program for teens, expanded bike lanes and technological advances.

“It’s a huge honor for Mexico City to be recognized as one of the most inspiring cities in the world on the GOOD City Index,” said Armando Lopez Cardenas, director of the Mexico City Tourism Promotion Fund. “We welcome visitors from around the globe to experience our great city again or for the first time, whether for business or leisure. Now is an exciting time to visit Mexico City.”
North American cities include Atlanta, Detroit, Los Angeles, New Orleans and Santa Fe in the U.S. and Montreal and Vancouver in Canada. The GOOD City Index is available online now at http://magazine.good.is/guides/good-cities-index-2014.

Mexico City is the country’s premier tourism destination, welcoming more than 12.5 million visitors a year. The ancient capital offers a vibrant, contemporary culture that combines pre-Hispanic, colonial and modern influences that span nearly seven centuries. With more than 160 museums, 30 distinct archaeological and historic sites, and 100 art galleries, the city is a mecca of fine art and treasures that speak to its vast history. The Mexico City Tourism Promotion Fund (Fondo Mixto de Promocion Turistica del Distrito Federal) supports and enhances city tourism. For more information and daily updates please visit/follow us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/MexicoCityLive) and Twitter (@MexicoCityLive).

Always A Tourist

Culture and Courtesy – Being a Better Traveler in Mexico

This post was previously published on Mexico Premiere. With Mexico travel season about to kick into gear, we have had several request to re-post it. Enjoy!

By: Lisa Coleman

I’m sure you’ve heard “when in Rome…. do as the Romans do,” but when stepping into a foreign country it’s really worth considering these words a bit more carefully. The saying originated in 387 A.D. when St. Augustine arrived in Milan and observed the Catholic Church did not fast on Saturday like it was done in Rome. He consulted the Bishop of Milan (St. Ambrose) about the matter who simply replied:  “When I am in Rome I fast on Saturday; when I am in Milan, I do not. Follow the custom of where you are.” That sentiment has stood the test of time and can really make a difference when visiting Mexico, or any other country for that matter.

I have traveled the world and feel there is nothing more frustrating than watching “ugly Americans” (Canadians are guilty, too!) being rude or disrespectful to the local people. Regardless of whether it’s an all-inclusive in Cancun where everyone speaks English, or an eco-hotel in the remote jungle of Chiapas, you are still a guest in Mexico… you are still visiting someone’s home.  As a citizen of the world, you owe it to yourself and your hosts to take the time to understand the basics of the Mexican culture and to embrace their hospitality with the respect it deserves.  I have seen bad manners exhibited many times in Mexico, so I am hoping to shed a little light on some common courtesies that may change your travel experience. At the very least, it will bring a smile to your Mexican hosts!
First, let’s talk about changing your mindset when you plan a trip to Mexico and switch from being a tourist to being a traveler.  What’s the difference? Plenty…

•    A tourist expects (and insists) everyone speaks English. A traveler tries to use even the most basic high school Spanish to make an effort.

•    A tourist is content to hang out at the swim-up bar getting lobster-red sunburn while becoming louder, drunker, and more obnoxious by the minute. The traveler heads into town, checks out the local markets, tries to make heads or tails of the menus at local restaurants and takes the time to stroll the streets, smile at the people and take in the flavor and color of the place they are visiting.

•    A tourist goes to the local McDonalds, American chain restaurant, or orders a hamburger at the hotel. A traveler will find out where the best local dishes are served and at the very least give them a try.

•    A tourist is content to be part of a group and to take large tours to all the most famous spots. A traveler tends to rent a car with a few other people (or solo) and explore the area on their own.
That list could go on forever, but you get the idea.

Always A TouristMexico is also far more formal than many would think. If you know anything about Mexican history, you know the Spanish had a tremendous influence on the people and culture of the country. The early Spanish overlords who came to Mexico in the 1500s brought the etiquette of the Royal Court of Spain, and many of those formalities still exist. As a rule, the Mexicans have maintained this cortesía, and it’s important that foreigners be aware and sensitive to not insulting the dignidad of the people they encounter.

The Basics
•    For starters, it helps to use Señor (Mr.) or Señora (Mrs.) with the men or women you encounter. Mexicans always address by social status and this immediately shows respect and will be a quick step in the right direction. (Señorita would be used to address a young, unmarried woman and is similar to Miss.)

•    In a restaurant, if you wish to call the waiter, you generally use the term Joven (Ho-ven). Though it means “young person,” it is an accepted term for all waiters. If you have a waitress, Señorita is appropriate. Snapping your fingers? Never.

•    “Please” (por favor) and “Thank You” (gracias) are a given if you’d like to ask an employee (or anyone for that matter) to do something. Look them in the eye and be sincere, it will take you a long way.

•    Americans tend to enter a room of strangers and only say hello in passing, if at all. They are usually casual, self absorbed and miss the almost constant greetings by their Mexican counterparts. Whether it’s in a public place with strangers, or with people you already know, say buenos días (good morning), buenas tardes (good afternoon) or buenas noches (good evening) to those you see. You’ll notice smiles right away.

•    Being humble is a cultural virtue often forgotten by visitors.  Mexicans will always welcome you when you arrive to your destination and refer to their home or even your hotel as su casa (your house). They are modest and truly want you to feel at home in their country. Keep an eye out for that and be sure to thank them for their hospitality.

•    If you can’t speak Spanish, don’t insult the local people by shouting louder and slower in English. It’s rude and it doesn’t change the fact that they don’t understand. They will appreciate any effort you make, regardless of your skill level.

•    YES it is customary to tip in Mexico.  Here is a great article for reference: http://gomexico.about.com/od/historyculture/qt/tipping_in_mexico.htm

•    Come to a church just as you would at home.  Be aware when entering and always take off sunglasses, baseball caps or hats. Wearing shorts is rarely an issue in the beach areas, but women should take care to wear a wrap or sweater to the waist to avoid showing too much skin, which could viewed disrespectful in such places.

•    The beach is the beach, but away from the resort areas shorts are very rarely worn by Mexicans on the street. Be cognizant of how you look and avoid drawing too much attention to yourself as a foreigner. Never wear shorts to a business event or to a restaurant outside the immediate resort area.
The Mexican culture isn’t overly complex. It’s built on simplicity, humility and courtesy. The people are tremendously warm and inviting, and genuinely care about their guests. Whether you’re a tourist, a traveler, or a little of both, take an extra few minutes to embrace Mexico at its core and I think you’ll come away with a deeper appreciation of a country waiting to invite you home.